Last edited by Doramar
Sunday, May 10, 2020 | History

3 edition of The Lowell Mill Girls found in the catalog.

The Lowell Mill Girls

Life in the Factory

by Joanne Weisman Deitch

  • 291 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by Tandem Library .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • General,
  • Women textile workers,
  • History - General History,
  • Juvenile literature,
  • Lowell,
  • Massachusetts,
  • Children: Grades 3-4

  • The Physical Object
    FormatSchool & Library Binding
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8102348M
    ISBN 100785774378
    ISBN 109780785774372

      Lowell Mill Girls Letters. Lowell Women Workers Campaign for a Ten Hour Workday. A selection of books/e-books available in Trible Library. Click the title for location and availability information. Off campus access instructions (for e-books). The cover of the periodical 'Lowell Offering', written by mill girls. The boarding houses and surrounding areas offered many opportunities and activities for girls with enough energy left to do them. The girls played the pianos in the boarding houses.

    ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: 52 pages: illustrations ; 19 cm. Contents: Lowell history at a glance / by Arthur L. Eno, mill girls of Lowell / . Try the new Google Books. Check out the new look and enjoy easier access to your favorite features. Try it now. No thanks. Try the new Google Books Get print book. No eBook available The Lowell Mill Girls: Life in the Factory. JoAnne Weisman Deitch. Discovery Enterprises, - Social Science - .

    Get this from a library! The Lowell mill girls.. [Tsongas Industrial History Center.;] -- "The Lowell Mill Girls packet is intended to provide basic information about the young women who worked in the Lowell textile mills from the s to the s. The packet includes four prints to use. - Explore tammerina's board "MIll Girls" on Pinterest. See more ideas about Old photos, Vintage photos and History pins.


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The Lowell Mill Girls by Joanne Weisman Deitch Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Lowell Mill Girls: Life in the Factory (Perspectives on History Series) 2nd Edition. by Joanne Weisman Deitch (Editor) out of 5 stars 1 rating.

ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important. ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version The Lowell Mill Girls book edition of a book. 1/5(1). This book gives an fairly detailed account of the lives of the Lowell mill girls from the s to the s.

It touches on the waves of immigrants that came through Lowell when the mill girls went off /5(4). The Lowell Mills were unique in that they had boarding houses, a hospital and a dining hall.

Eventually, women moved on, and the Mills became more and more mechanized, as well as laws were passed to limit Note: this is part of a series, all others have a similar format/5.

The Lowell Mill Girls book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Primary sources, i.e., letters, journals, etc.

of the young wo /5. The Daring Ladies of Lowell was a great read that brings attention to the working conditions of the mill girls of Lowell.

Taking some historical details and making a fictional story featuring characters that the reader comes to care about really makes these horrific conditions more real/5. The Lowell Mill Girls were female workers in early 19th century America, young women employed in an innovative system of labor in textile mills centered in Lowell, Massachusetts.

The employment of women in a factory was novel to the point of being revolutionary. The majority of mill girls in Lowell lived in boardinghouses. These large, corporation-owned buildings were often run by a female keeper, or a husband and wife.

A typical boardinghouse consisted of eight units, with 20 to 40 women living in each unit. Mill Girls of Lowell (History Compass) Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Loom and Spindle: Or, Life among the Early Mill Girls; with a Sketch of "The Lowell Offering" and some of Its Contributors.

Only. Harriet Hanson Robinson went to work as a Lowell mill girl when she was 10 years old to help support her family. She grew up to earn fame, if not fortune. She started off writing the mill girls’ magazine, The Lowell Offering, then wrote books.

No two women’s experiences were entirely alike. The women came from places of need, curiosity, and independence. The items in this exhibit show that mill girls were not just blank figures, as Herman Melville’s notorious story, “Tartarus of Maids,” had depicted, but that they had goals and aspirations, passions and fears.

The Lowell Mill Girls We the People We the People: Industrial America Series We the people (Series) (Compass Point Books) Author: Alice K. Flanagan: Publisher: Capstone, ISBN:Length: 48 pages: Subjects. The Lowell, Mass., textile mills where they worked were widely admired.

But for the young women from around New England who made the mills run, they were a living hell. A mill worker named Amelia—we don't know her full name—wrote that mill girls worked an average of nearly 13 hours a day. Books Go Search EN Hello, Sign in Account & Lists Sign in Account & Lists Orders Try Prime Cart.

Best Sellers Gift Ideas New Releases Whole Foods Today's Deals AmazonBasics Coupons Gift Cards Customer Service Free Shipping Shopper Toolkit Registry Sell. Books. Primary Source: Lowell Mill Girls, Harriet Robinson: Lowell Mill Girls In her autobiography, Harriet Hanson Robinson, the wife of a newspaper editor, provided an account of her earlier life as female factory worker (from the age of ten in to ) in the textile Mills of Lowell, Massachusetts.

Lowell Mill Girls In her autobiography, Harriet Hanson Robinson, the wife of a newspaper editor, provided an account of her earlier life as female factory worker (from the age of ten in to ) in the textile Mills of Lowell, Massachusetts.

The Lowell Mill Girls. Compass Point Books, Websites: Lowell Mill Girls. Mill Life in Lowell: Tales of Factory Life, No. Women, Work, and Protest in the Early Lowell Mills. Journals Written by Lowell Mill Participants. Writings of Lowell Mill Girls.

Credits. The "Mill Girls" were female workers who came to work for the textile corporations in Lowell, Massachusetts, during the Industrial Revolution in the United States. The workers initially recruited by the corporations were daughters of propertied New England farmers, between the ages of 15 and (There also could be "little girls" who worked there about the age of ).

During this time, technological innovation, investment capital, entrepreneurship, new methods of industrial organization, and labor provided by "mill girls" propelled large-scale manufacturing in an important U.S.

industry. Mill Girls of Lowell gives insight into the role of mill girls in the story of modernization and : History Compass, LLC. The Lowell mill girls had more freedom than women had ever had before because they had more freedom than women who stayed at home.

I started my research at the Bedford Public Library. I checked out many books that seemed to relate well to my topic. My most important source was the book Loom and Spindle: Life among the Early Mill Girls, by.

“The mill girls generally worked from months a year, the rest of the time was spent with parents or friends.” While working, many girls settled in on-site boardinghouses and “The average earnings of most mill girls were $ to $ a week after paying board of $ to $”.

Get this from a library! The Lowell mill girls. [Alice K Flanagan] -- Discusses the history of the first mill in the United States to use machines to turn raw cotton into finished cloth, the women who worked in the mill, and how the innovations in the textile industry.Bibliography * indicates that the book is available in paperback.

Sources for Young People: *Avi. Beyond the Western Sea – Lord Kirkle’s d Books, An historical epic aimed at middle school readers, the novel relates the story of children who flee the famine in Ireland for work in the Lowell mills, arriving in during a period of rising anti-immigrant sentiment.

“The Lowell System required hiring of young (usually single) women between the ages of 15 and Single women were chosen because they could be paid less than men, thus increasing corporate profits, and because they could be more easily controlled then men.

These mill girls, as they were called, were required to live in company-owned.